Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Tree Following, July 7, 2015

The tree I am following is an Ornamental Pear.  It has masses of beautiful white flowers in the Spring, and in the Autumn the leaves turn red/orange.  The fruit is tiny, but it is enjoyed by the birds in the Winter.
Ornamental Pear, Prentiss county, Mississippi, USA, July 6, 2015

I was hoping for a sunny blue sky for this photo's background, but we've had cloudy, rainy skies for a week or more. 


It is a tall tree with glossy green leaves.  It has probably grown a little since last month, but not enough to tell the difference.  I didn't know what I could post about this month until I remembered a tip from another Tree Follower (or was it you, Lucy?):  Look around to see what is growing under or near the tree.  So I looked underneath the tree and found ...........


Moss!  A pretty green carpet thriving in the shade the tree provides.  (I think that orange dot is a tiny mushroom).  I had to really hunker down and set the camera on the ground to get this photo, but I think it well worth the trouble.  I don't get up and down as well as I used to!

Have a wonderful day!

To learn more about Tree Following, visit Lucy at Loose and Leafy:  Click Here!


NOTE: Please do not use my photos without my permission.


Friday, July 3, 2015

Night-Blooming Cactus, July 3, 2015

Night-Blooming Cactus, Prentiss county, Mississippi, USA, June 28, 2015

The huge flowers open for one night only and are pollinated by night-flying insects.  They begin to close at the first hint of daylight.

Here is US zone 7, Night-Blooming Cacti can live outdoors in the Summer, but must be moved indoors for the Winter.


Sometimes, if the weather is exactly right, they will bloom again in early October. 


July 4th
Veterans Park, Tupelo, Mississippi, USA
 The Prisoner of War / Missing in Action flag is inscribed 'You are not forgotten.'

Happy Independence Day, America!

For more flower photos, visit Floral Friday Fotos:  Click Here!

And for a variety of interesting photos, visit Photo Friday:  Click Here!

NOTE: Please do not use my photos without my permission.


Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Red-Headed Woodpeckers, July 1, 2015

Wild Bird Wednesday, ABC Wednesday, and Wednesday Waters

Wild Bird Wednesday
Red-Headed Woodpecker, Booneville, Mississippi, USA, June 28, 2015
Red-Headed Woodpeckers, Melanerpes erythrocephalus, have a breeding range all across the eastern half of the United States and southeastern Canada. They can be found at any time of the year in the southeastern US except for tropical Florida.  Males and females have the same coloring; juveniles have a brown head instead of red.

Woodpeckers drill holes in trees and posts looking for wood-boring insects, and they search the ground for beetles, ants, and dropped seeds. They can catch flying insects in mid-air much like a Flycatcher, and they store acorns and nuts for winter food.




Woodpeckers can use their stiff tail feathers as a brace as they drill for insects or excavate a cavity for a nest.  You can attract them to your area by filling feeders with cracked corn, sunflower seeds, and suet.

ABC Wednesday
Y is for Yellow


Lots of things are yellow, of course, but I was intrigued by this leaf caught in a spider's web.

Wednesday Waters
Tenn-Tom Waterway, Tishomingo county, Mississippi, USA, June 26, 2015

The Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway is a man-made canal that connects the Tennessee River to the Port of Mobile on the Gulf Coast (234 miles - 377 kilometers) via the Tombigbee River. It provides commercial navigation from the mid-south region of the country to the Gulf of Mexico.  As a happy side-effect of its ten locks and dams, we have lakes for fishing and water sports, and there are wildlife management areas along its banks.

Have a Wonderful Day!

For more wild bird photos, visit Stewart for Wild Bird Wednesday:  Click Here!

For more photos of things beginning with Y, visit ABC Wednesday:  Click Here!

For more photos of water, visit Gemma for Wednesday Waters:  Click Here!


NOTE: Please do not use my photos without my permission.


Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Rattlesnake Saloon, June 30, 2015

Rattlesnake Saloon, Colbert county, Alabama, USA, June 26, 2015
The Rattlesnake Saloon is a unique family-style restaurant built in the mouth of a cave near Tuscumbia, Alabama (1292 Mt. Mills Road).  If you don't like the idea of eating in a cave, there is an indoor dining room available.  The food is delicious - a dozen or so different sandwiches with chips, fries, onion rings, or potato salad. Beverages are soft drinks, tea or coffee; beer is available after 5:00pm. Oh, I almost forgot the appetizers.  We tried the 'snake eyes and tails' - fried sliced jalapeno peppers and fried green beans.  Yummy!

There is a short (but steep) walkway from the parking lot down to the restaurant, or you can take the free 'Saloon Taxi' down the hill and back up again.


Hope you are having a wonderful day!

To see photos of a lot of interesting places, visit Our World Tuesday:  Click Here!

NOTE: Please do not use my photos without my permission.

Monday, June 29, 2015

Wildflower, June 29, 2015

Prentiss county, Mississippi, USA, June 25, 2015
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Have a Wonderful Week!

For more macro photos, visit Macro Monday 2:  Click Here!

For more photos featuring the color Yellow, visit Monday Mellow Yellows:  Click Here!


NOTE: Please do not use my photos without my permission.

Saturday, June 27, 2015

Vultures for Saturday Silhouettes, June 27, 2015

Turkey Vultures, Prentiss county, Mississippi, USA, June 8, 2015















Two vultures got into a dispute over who gets to sit at the very top of a dead tree. The third vulture looks like he is about to fly away and leave them to it.

I don't usually post twice on the same day, but Nick has a brand new meme, Saturday Silhouettes, and I wanted to get in on the ground floor, so to speak.

Have a great week-end!

For more Silhouettes, visit NixPixMix:  Click Here!

NOTE: Please do not use my photos without my permission.


June Bugs, June 27, 2015

June Bugs, Prentiss county, Mississippi, USA, June 25, 2015


















Wikipedia describes June Bugs as New World Scarab Beetles, and adds that there are over 260 species.  They are very common here in the southeastern United States.  I don't know why they often have one leg stretched straight out. 














The plant they are eating is Wisteria (it will recover magnificently - nothing kills Wisteria here).

Have a wonderful week-end!

For more Camera Critters: Click Here!

For more Saturday's Critters:  Click Here!


NOTE: Please do not use my photos without my permission.